Delhi Journal of Ophthalmology

Comment on “Patterns of Ocular Trauma Presenting to the Tertiary Eye Care Centre in the Islands of Andaman and Nicobar”

Bharat Gurnani
Department of Cornea and Refractive Services, Aravind Eye Hospital, Pondicherry, India

Kirandeep Kaur
Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Aravind Eye Hospital, Pondicherry, India

Corresponding Author:

Bharat Gurnani, DNB
Aravind Eye Hospital, Pondicherry, India 
Email: drgurnanibharat25@gmail.com

Received: 02-AUG-2020

Accepted: 31-AUG-2020

Published Online: 20-DEC-2020

DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7869/djo.611

Abstract

Keywords :

Dear Editor,

We read the article “Patterns of Ocular Trauma Presenting to the Tertiary Eye Care Centre in the Islands of Andaman and Nicobar” by Das et al1 with great interest. However, we have a few important questions and suggestions to make.
The important question in the methodology is that authors used what classification for classifying the traumatic injury Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology System (BETTS)2 or the Ocular Trauma Score Classification system.3 The authors have used ONTT guidelines for traumatic optic neuropathy with intravenous methyl-prednisolone 30mg bolus followed by 5.4 mg / kg/ body wt for 48 hour, but ONTT guideline state that IV methylprednisolone 1 g was given (diluted in 100 ml normal saline over 45 min) for 3 days. Then, oral prednisolone 1 mg/kg in tapering dose is administered for 2 weeks. Can the authors throw some light on this.4 The authors have treated surgical aphakia with anterior chamber IOL(ACIOL). At what duration postoperatively did the ACIOL was implanted and did the authors encounter any complications post operatively. At our centre, scleral fixated intraocular lens (SFIOL) is used considering the long term complications of anterior chamber IOL like corneal decompensation and secondary glaucoma.5 The author have highlighted in the methodology that those who had severe penetrating eye injury, globe rupture and had no vision (PL negative) underwent enucleation under general anaesthesia. Did any of these patients had endophthalmitis or pan ophthalmitis and did the authors address penetrating eye injury with primary repair? At our centre, the primary repair is addressed first and enucleation is performed only for pan ophthalmitisafter informed consent.

References
  1. Das S, Rana M Patterns of Ocular Trauma Presenting to the Tertiary Eye Care Centre in the Islands of Andaman and Nicobar. DJO 2020;30:20-26
  2. Kuhn F, Morris R, Witherspoon CD, Mester V. The Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology system (BETT). J Fr Ophtalmol. 2004;27(2):206–10
  3. Yu Wai Man C, Steel D. Visual outcome after open globe injury: a comparison of two prognostic models--the Ocular Trauma Score andthe Classification and Regression Tree. Eye (Lond). 2010;24(1):84-89
  4. Pirouzmand F. Epidemiological trends of traumatic optic nerve injuries in the largest Canadian adult trauma center. J Craniofac Surg2012;23:516-20.
  5. Walters RF, McGill JI, Batterbury M, Williams JD. Complications of anterior chamber lens implants and their effects on the endothelium. Eye (Lond). 1989;3 ( Pt 6):690-695

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Gurnani B, Kaur KComment on “Patterns of Ocular Trauma Presenting to the Tertiary Eye Care Centre in the Islands of Andaman and Nicobar”.DJO 2020;31:113

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Gurnani B, Kaur KComment on “Patterns of Ocular Trauma Presenting to the Tertiary Eye Care Centre in the Islands of Andaman and Nicobar”.DJO [serial online] 2020[cited 2021 Jan 26];31:113. Available from: http://www.djo.org.in/articles/31/2/Comment-on-Patterns-of-Ocular-Trauma-Presenting-to-the-Tertiary-Eye-Care-Centre.html