Delhi Journal of Ophthalmology

Comment on Re: Smartphone Fundus Videography for Documentation of Retinal and Optic Nerve Head Diseases

Joseph W. Fong1, Sami H. Uwaydat1, Jeffrey L. Yee2
1Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.
2Department of Ophthalmology, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System (CAVHS), Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.

Corresponding Author:

Joseph W. Fong (MD)
Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
Email: jfong32@gmail.com

Received: 28-APR-2021

Accepted: 08-MAY-2021

Published Online: 05-OCT-2021

DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7869/djo-706

Abstract

Keywords :Fundus Photography, Smartphone Photography, Covid-19

Dear Sir, 
We read with interest the article ‘Smartphone Fundus Videography for Documentation of Retinal and Optic Nerve Head Diseases’ by Hans et al. (2021). We wish to congratulate the authors for their excellent discussion regarding the use of smartphones common to so many of us to obtain high-quality fundus photography.

At our academic institution, the utility of smartphone fundus photography has been particularly invaluable during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our resident physicians receive inpatient consultation requests multiple times per day for non-ambulatory patients, oncology patients, and critically-ill patients – most who cannot be transported to the eye clinic. These consults often include rule out of chorioretinitis with fungemia, evaluation of retinal hemorrhages in non-accidental trauma, and rule out of posterior segment pathology in neuro-intensive care patients. During the pandemic, smartphone fundus photography allowed resident physicians to provide high-quality documentation of retinal findings while minimizing unnecessary exposure to other staff physicians. They could also receive immediate feedback from attending physicians and senior-level resident physicians when they were unsure of their findings. In our experience, we found that the smartphone fundus photographs approach the quality of portable imaging modalities such as the RetCam (Clarity Medical Systems USA) while offering superior portability and ease of cleaning. With concerns over sanitation paramount during the pandemic, we found it impractical to risk contaminating the RetCam by transporting it to and from the inpatient units (and subsequently contaminating the eye clinic). In conclusion, we echo the authors’ endorsement of smartphone fundus photography in an ever-evolving COVID climate.

References
  1. Hans R, Uzair M, Kaushik A. Smartphone Fundus Videography For Documentation Of Retinal And Optic Nerve Head Diseases. DJO 2021;31:112-117

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Fong JW, Uwaydat SH, Yee JLComment on Re: Smartphone Fundus Videography for Documentation of Retinal and Optic Nerve Head Diseases.DJO 2021;32:101

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Fong JW, Uwaydat SH, Yee JLComment on Re: Smartphone Fundus Videography for Documentation of Retinal and Optic Nerve Head Diseases.DJO [serial online] 2021[cited 2021 Dec 6];32:101. Available from: https://www.djo.org.in/articles/32/1/Smartphone-Fundus-Videography-for-Documentation-of-Retinal.html